Advertising trade associations plead for mercy from Google

First, let’s establish the situation: the prosperity of the digital ad industry is dependent on a single company. That company, of course, is Google. In January, Google announced it was planning to phase out the allowance of third-party cookies in the Chrome browser. It’s a …


I’ve just learned of the very unfortunate news that WordCamp Asia 2020, due to take place in Bangkok from February 21, has been cancelled. We all know about Mobile World Congress – to date the highest-profile trade show to be cancelled due to uncertainty around the coronavirus epidemic. But unlike MWC, WordCamps are community driven and supported by individuals – often with very limited budgets and resources. Compared to an industry event such as MWC, the cancellation of WordCamp Asia will be far more impactful in terms of personal costs.

In light of this reality, Wordfence and GoDaddy have graciously offered to help defray expenses associated with cancelling flight and hotel reservations. Thank you!


Google’s privacy plans may exempt themselves

I recently commented on Google’s intentions to implement two important measures to combat rampant user tracking by third parties – and thereby put a kibosh to user fingerprinting and planting browser cookies that can stay in perpetuity. Alas, they’ve done a very fine job making …

Why do we tolerate creepy marketing behavior?

I continue to find it amazing that ethics is largely ignored in today’s marketing practices. In all the rush of social media and growth-driven marketing, behaviors tantamount to violating user privacy have somehow been acceptable. Any of us would find them utterly objectionable. And yet, …

Lyft adds to marketing-related job cutbacks

As the latest in a string of recent layoff announcements from tech-related companies, Lyft has stated it will be eliminating 90 jobs in its marketing and enterprise sales operations. The layoffs in marketing are reportedly aimed to consolidate city-focused teams into regional groups – something …

More details on privacy plans for Chrome

Google made a rather surprising announcement in 2019 about its intentions to take user privacy seriously and begin taking steps to stop allowing third parties to track users via Chrome. Now, they’ve just followed up with some more concrete information and plans. Google will be …

Time to open up to the desktop, Instagram

It was just announced that Instagram will allow direct messaging (DM) access from a desktop browser. But things can and should go further. Instagram should allow posting and commenting from the desktop as well. It’s about time. Instagram was envisioned as an appealing way to …


At long last, and on the exact day promised by Microsoft (January 15), their all-new Edge browser is here. It’s available for Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 10, and macOS, and you can get it right away by grabbing a download at microsoft.com/edge. As first announced late 2018, the new Microsoft Edge replaces the current (or soon legacy) Edge browser with an overhaul that utilizes Chromium as the foundation. In simple terms, this means that the new Edge gives you basically the same web browsing experience as if you were using Chrome – thereby ending the painfully unreliable web rendering of past Microsoft web browsers.

For now, it’s available if you manually download and install it yourself. But if you’re willing to wait around, the new Edge will eventually ship with a forthcoming Windows Update for your PC.



There’s an interesting profile of Adam Mosseri, head of Instagram, with a focus on what appears to be essentially a done deal: an end to public “like” counts on Instagram users’ postings. This has been in testing throughout 2019 on a trial basis in many countries including the US. Interestingly, Mosseri sees the eventual elimination of like metrics as atoning for mistakes that happened in the past at Facebook, loading to emotional pressures and even toxicity of being popular on social media.

Whether or not Instagram will remove public “likes” isn’t the real question here, but whether Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Snap will follow suit based on the same rationale.


Is the CMO title on life support?

I’m going to go out on a limb with an observation and a prediction. The Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) title is seriously on life support. In less than 5 years, the CMO position will be out of existence altogether. I’ve noticed an accelerating trend of …